Emigrants, from Great Britain, Ireland, to Australia, 1825-1832 (2022)

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Emigrants, from Great Britain, Ireland, to Australia, 1825-1832 (13)
Emigrants, from Great Britain, Ireland, to Australia, 1825-1832 (14)

Extracted from the British Parliamentary Papers of 1833 XXVI 279

Emigrants from Great Britain & Ireland to Australia: 1825-1832

Number of Emigrants to the Australian Colonies

Ports of EmbarkationIn the Year 1825In the Year 1826In the Year 1827In the Year 1828In the Year 1829In the Year 1830In the Year 1831In the Year
1832
London3428826168911,8241,0989922,146
Arundel----41---
Bristol-----85(Accounts destroyed)-
Liverpool12-----3191,377
Plymouth40-34691002-16
Portsmouth--4-----
Weymouth-------6
Greenock--7--20967
Leith91215496513719181
Dublin------135-

Total from the United Kingdom

4859037151,0562,0161,2421,5613,733

No. 2

Return of the Number of Families who have Emigrated to New South Wales and Van Diemen’sLand since the formation of the Board of Emigration up to the present time, having receivedLoans from Government to enable them to Emigrate; specifying, First, the Colony to which suchEmigration took place; Second, the Number of Persons in each Family; Third, the Amount ofAssistance granted.

ColonyTotal Number
of Families
Total Number of Persons
in these Families
Total Amount of
Money expended
New South Wales3971,538£7,831
Van Diemen’s Land4221,571£8,406

New South Wales

(Names have been changed to list last name first but the order is maintained. Amount granted is given in pounds.)

NameTradeNumber of Persons
in each Family
Amount granted
to each
M’Enally, FrancisShoemaker510
Colman, ThomasPainter820
Lacy, BernardWeaver520
Whipp, JohnEngineer415
Neill, MichaelSawyer216
Cannon, JohnCartwright213
Palmer, HenryWheelwright620
M’Kernan, Wm.Blacksmith216
Mullin, WilliamSawyer220
Flinigan, WilliamNailor410
Clayton, HenryFarrier220
Francis, HenryEngineer820
Ward, WilliamTanner420
Powys, Robert OwenUpholsterer220
Reardon, PatrickWeaver720
Galvin, JamesPlasterer520
Heald, JohnBrick-maker210
Burn, EdwardEngineer720
Fitzimons, WilliamShoemaker210
Monarty, ThomasBricklayer620
Brown, NewarkWhitesmith515
Donnelly, JohnFarrier520
Keane, BernardGardener820
Shone, WilliamShoemaker520
Hoare, RobertShoemaker420
Browne, GeorgePainter218
Lloyd, WilliamSawyer220
Davies, MichaelStone-mason220
Grumbley, PatrickSawyer220
Harbottle, ThomasPainter320
Short, FelixWeaver520
Sexton, WilliamTailor520
White, StephenQuarryman720
Maddocks, SamuelCabinet-maker220
Smith, ThomasShoemaker620
Wright, JohnWeaver220
Hartley, ThomasButcher216
King, MosesFarmer620
Hopwood, CharlesEngineer620
Laity, ThomasEngineer720
Widdrington,WilliamSawyer220
Mansfield, RichardBaker520
M’Namara, PatrickPainter320
Sale, JamesBlacksmith220
Lloyd, JohnSlater520
Flockton, WilliamButcher420
M’Donald, JamesStone-mason220
Davis, JamesBrick-maker215
Williamson, GeorgeCutler220
Smedley, BenjaminBrick-maker220
Brereton, GeorgeHarness-maker620
Sennett, MosesCarpenter220
Galvin, JohnWeaver520
O’Byrne, MichaelCoach-painter520
Owens, JohnBricklayer320
Rule, JohnSawyer420
Sands, MichaelShoemaker320
Greene, ThomasWeaver520
Austin, GeorgeSawyer320
Fitzimons, Nicholas---------320
Grindle, RobertWeaver320
Farrell, EdwardShoemaker220
Burns, RichardWeaver420
Hobson, WalterCarpenter220
M’Evoy, JamesSailor311
Norris, JosephShipwright520
Maher, ThomasShoemaker220
Burns, R.H.Tin-plate-worker220
Smith, JamesCarpenter220
Bale, WilliamBricklayer220
Turnbull, IsaacFarrier720
Stewart, RobertWatch-maker220
Rea, JohnCoach-painter220
Barton, EdmundSchoolmaster420
Priston, WilliamPainter620
Gase, CharlesCollar-maker220
Mann, WilliamShipwright320
Bond, JohnCarpenter220
White, BryceCooper620
Wagg, GeorgeBlacksmith420
Jones, ThomasSmith520
Cox, AndrewCaulker220
Harris, MathewCarpenter520
Wickham, GeorgeGlazier420
Dieckman, Johan H.Tailor220
Hyman, ThomasWheelwright320
Baldy, RobertJoiner520
Ward, DavidCandle-maker220
Peters, RobertChair-maker220
Stevenson, JohnButcher220
Fletcher, JohnWeaver220
Ferguson, JohnWeaver820
Ferguson, RobertWeaver620
M’Ewen, RobertShoemaker720
Fyfe, AlexanderCoppersmith220
Struth, WilliamEngineer220
Struth, JohnEngineer220
Dundas, JohnTailor420
M’Adam, WilliamShoemaker620
Mallon, JohnNailor320
Stewart, JohnPrinter420
Wood, JohnHarness-maker220
Forrester, WilliamWeaver220
Weatherall, JosephCoach-maker220
M’Lean, FelixJoiner220
Chambers, HughHarness-maker220
Villers, WilliamSawyer320
White, JohnJoiner220
Nairne, JamesWeaver220
Greene, WilliamBlacksmith220
Taylor, DavidStone-cutter220
D’Arcey, MichaelHarness-maker320
Trewren, JohnStone-cutter220
Connelly, JamesCarpenter320
M’Leish, JamesBaker420
Elphinstone, WilliamJoiner520
Buddivent, GeorgeShipwright820
Allingham, JohnCaulker320
Look, JosephBoat-builder420
Williams, JosiahBoat-builder320
Hollingdale, RobertS.Stone-mason320
Stevens, JamesCooper620
Reilly, JohnSaddler420
Clark, ThomasBrick-maker320
Laverty, EdwardPianoforte-maker220
Braddy, John B.Schoolmaster520
Minchin, James A.Cabinet-maker420
Ferry, TimothyLocksmith320
Whittaker, JamesStone-cutter520
Dogherty, PatrickBlacksmith420
Richardson, ThomasGardener520
Hancock, ThomasWeaver620
Thompson, JohnWool-sorter520
Maynes, JamesCarpenter220
Maynes, ArthurCarpenter320
Nolan, HughBaker320
Ellard, FrancisBrass-worker420
Weir, AndrewCarpenter320
Curry, JamesWeaver220
Hull, GeorgeBlacksmith420
Wright, RobertWheelwright920
Allan, WilliamButcher220
Barwick, JamesJoiner220
Morton, RobertTailor620
Cherry, ThomasWeaver320
Glover, CharlesBricklayer220
Banfield, HewitCooper620
Toole, GeorgeCooper420
Banfield, ThomasCooper220
Seller, ThomasCarpenter420
Anmer, WilliamShipwright620
Rattenbury, JamesCarpenter216
Wechinger, JosephCabinet-maker320
Rodgers, GeorgeCutler520
Atkins, WilliamStone-mason520
Woolcott, WilliamShoemaker620
Pirie, JohnCooper620
Hurt, WilliamEngineer620
Shaw, WilliamCooper720
Farrell, MichaelTailor220
Brown, RobertCarpenter220
Downey, PatrickCarpenter220
Turnley, JamesCarpenter420
Christy, AbelBlacksmith220
Stark, RichardBaker220
Buxton, ThomasWheelwright220
Wheeler —Silk-dyer420
Smith, FrederickShoemaker420
James, JosephSawyer220
Southard, WilliamSmith320
Healy, ThomasButcher620
Johnson, AndrewDyer320
Chell, EdwardShoemaker720
Deerchar, ThomasBlacksmith320
Mather, WilliamBrass-founder620
M’Gibbon, JohnRope-maker220
M’Lean, WilliamStone-mason220
Neville, JamesCarpenter220
Ewen, JamesCabinet-maker620
Barnes, JohnCooper520
M’Kenzie, WilliamShipwright320
Lennard, MauricePlasterer220
Hayes, ElishaDyer320
Simons, HenryBricklayer320
Jackson, HenryBookbinder220
Rawlings, EdwardBricklayer420
Moses, JohnBaker520
Moses, AbrahamHatter420
Myers, IsraelButcher220
Beaver, WilliamCarpenter620
Bradwell, ThomasDyer820
Candish, JosephJoiner420
Todd, FrancisBlacksmith620
Murray, JohnWeaver520
Sennett, JohnSlater320
Williams, WilliamJoiner520
Orr, WilliamMillwright320
Brown, WilliamCooper520
Naughtan, BryanHatter620
Downes, WilliamBaker320
Venables, RichardStone-mason720
Challinor, WilliamStone-mason320
Patterson, RobertStone-mason220
Larkin, MartinHerdsman420
Severn, WilliamComb-maker620
Elliot, SimonTailor420
Field, StephenCooper220
Wise, JohnTanner220
Hewitson, JosephEngineer320
Boatwright, JamesCarpenter220
May, BenjaminSmith310
Scott, AndrewSmith620
Mercer, DavidPlasterer220
Sheridan, JamesGun-maker320
Swan, RobertSmith420
Dove, JohnShoemaker520
Orchard, HenryTailor220
Winstanley, WilliamPainter820
Dallas, WilliamBlacksmith220
Carey, JohnWeaver420
Pillinger, JamesMason220
Quin, James-----------220
Barnett, HenryGlazier320
Wilkie, GeorgeBaker220
Patten, WilliamStone-mason220
Colinshaw, ThomasStone-mason220
Froomes, JohnPainter220
Smith, ThomasCarpenter220
Bishop, JohnCarpenter220
Bownan [sic], JamesShoemaker420
Yabsley, BenjaminSawyer320
Davison, ThomasCarpenter720
King, GeorgeShoemaker820
Inglis, WilliamTailor220
Jaggars, JohnButcher420
Wright, MathewPainter520
Inglis, JohnShoemaker220
Hutchinson, GeorgeSaddler420
Pickling, JosephHarness-maker215
King, SamuelTailor215
M’Gregor, LewisCabinet-maker220
M’Lean, CharlesEngineer320
Curran, PatrickStone-mason420
Jones, JohnSaddler220
Walker, JohnSawyer820
Thompson, JamesSawyer320
Phillips, SolomonBlacksmith220
Solomon, S.M.Carpenter420
Friedman, IsaacVarnish-maker220
Isaacs, JohnTailor220
Bell, JohnCarpenter220
Blackwell, JohnPainter320
Campbell, JamesWeaver620
Broomhall, JohnCabinet-maker820
Richards, WilliamBlacksmith920
Hulmes, RobertCooper220
Wilson, ThomasDyer420
Clarke, JohnCarpenter520
Williamson, JamesIron-founder520
Hartley, SamuelBlacksmith420
Graham, ThomasCabinet-maker820
Milward, LukeCooper220
Turnbull, ArchibaldDyer320
Leahy, JohnMason320
Tym, WilliamCabinet-maker520
Murray, JohnTailor420
Collins, RobertGlazier620
Vaughan, MichaelStone-mason320
O’Neill, JamesBrick-maker220
Frazer, AlexanderPainter520
M’Larkin, ThomasJoiner220
Bell, GeorgeWeaver220
M’Intyre, HughSlater620
Phillips, B.A.Carpenter1020
Chapman, CharlesCooper520
Grose, WilliamPainter420
Trood, AbelGilder420
Robertson, HenryCarpenter220
Turton, JamesPlasterer820
Turton, WilliamPlasterer320
Ringwood, JohnBrick-maker220
Cochrane, JohnWeaver420
Hastie, CharlesBaker320
Longhead, JohnRope-spinner320
Heron, JamesShoemaker620
Dowie, AndrewCooper520
Yeats, JohnMason520
Campbell, Fred.Cooper220
Wilson, JohnBlacksmith620
Walters, SamuelBricklayer220
Barlow, RichardSmith620
Benham, JohnCarpenter620
Carter, BenjaminTailor520
Duffell, John----------420
Harris, JohnCarpenter820
Hood, JohnCoachmaker520
Laver, WilliamShoemaker420
Notley, RobertMason220
Peden, DavidWeaver420
Bowler, JesseBricklayer820
Innes, AlexanderGunsmith420
Robertson, WilliamTailor820
Hogan, J.Plasterer520
Boucher, ThomasWaterman520
Farmer, RichardTailor320
Blanchard, MarkCarpenter220
Amos, GeorgeShipwright320
Skyring, DanielBricklayer520
Furey, JohnGlazier420
Coughlan, JohnTailor520
M’Kew, Peter----------620
Lee, BenjaminHatter420
Brons, John----------220
Cutler, BenjaminBuilder520
Gatty, JohnTailor220
Irwin, FrederickWire-worker520
Carrick, ThomasCarpenter420
Vickery, JosephShoemaker820
Haild, ThomasDyer520
Heaton, ThomasEngineer320
Stephens, EdwardsSpinner220
Henry, ThomasSpinner220
Murdoch, JohnWeaver
(sailed 15 June 1833on the barque Lady East from Liverpool to Sydney via Hobart,15th Nov. 1833)
220

The Hobart Town Courier, Friday 25 October 1833, p. 3

TRADE AND SHIPPING.

On the same day [23rd inst.], the bark Lady East, 648 tons, Capt. Alexander Strachan, from Liverpool 15th June, with a general cargo, consisting of salt &c. Passengers:- Mr. and Mrs. Harnett [Harnell ?] and 2 children, Mr. & Mrs. Higgins, Mr. and Mrs. Lindsay, Miss Murray, Miss M. and Miss C. Murray, Mr. Murray . Mr. Paterson, Mr. McGelchie, Dr. Harnett, Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell and 209 others

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 16 November 1833, p. 2

From Liverpool and Hobart Town, the same day [yesterday], the ship Lady East (668 tons), Captain Strachan, with merchandise. Passengers;- Mr. Lawrence Harnell, farmer, Mr. Harnell [Harnett Mrs. ?], and 5 children ; Mr. John McGechie, merchant ; Mr. J. Higgins, merchant ; Mr. Joseph Mitchell, merchant, and Mrs. Ann Mitchell ; Mr. W. Lindsey, and Mrs. Lindsey [Lindsay] ; and P. Harnatt, Esq., surgeon ; and 236 steerage passengers.

Madden, WilliamPainter220
Massess, JosephCarpenter620
Davies, WilliamShoemaker220
Holderness, WilliamPainter320
Wrangham, TimothyCoppersmith220
Atkinson, JamesSaddler720
Armstrong, JohnPlasterer320
Arthur, JamesPlasterer320
Bradley, PatrickCooper220
Birmingham, EdwardHouse-smith
(sailed 15 June 1833on the barque Lady East from Liverpool to Sydney via Hobart,15th Nov. 1833)
220
Browne, JosephBaker220
Craig, JamesPlumber and Glazier
(sailed 15 June 1833on the barque Lady East from Liverpool to Sydney via Hobart,15th Nov. 1833)
320
Calhane, FrancisCooper320
Chisholm, WilliamCabinet-maker
(sailed 15 June 1833on the barque Lady East from Liverpool to Sydney via Hobart,15th Nov. 1833)
220
Crouch, ThomasBrick and Tile-maker420
Etherington, JamesBlacksmith
(sailed 15 June 1833on the barque Lady East from Liverpool to Sydney via Hobart,15th Nov. 1833)
720
Foy, EdwardTailor
(sailed 15 June 1833on the barque Lady East from Liverpool to Sydney via Hobart,15th Nov. 1833)
320
Finlay, JamesMason220
Griffiths, JohnStone-mason920
Heaton, JamesBrush-maker
(sailed 15 June 1833on the barque Lady East from Liverpool to Sydney via Hobart,15th Nov. 1833)
620
Lawson, AlexanderJoiner320
Lodge, RobertCarpenter
(sailed 15 June 1833on the barque Lady East from Liverpool to Sydney via Hobart,15th Nov. 1833)
320
Lammont, ArchibaldCooper520
Larymore, AlexanderW.Cooper
(sailed 15 June 1833on the barque Lady East from Liverpool to Sydney via Hobart,15th Nov. 1833)
420
M’Jennett, RichardPrinter320
M’Donnell, JohnCurrier220
Murphy, MichaelTanner320
Priest, JohnTurner
(sailed 15 June 1833on the barque Lady East from Liverpool to Sydney via Hobart,15th Nov. 1833)
820
Pearson, JohnCabinet-maker1020
Rourke, PatrickWeaver520
Russell, ThomasCarpenter
(sailed 15 June 1833on the barque Lady East from Liverpool to Sydney via Hobart,15th Nov. 1833)
320
Strong, JosephCabinet-maker220
Strong, GeorgeTailor420
Verden, GeorgeWeaver420
Warren, JamesPlasterer820
Woodrow, JohnTailor520
Smith, AlfredChemist320
Hobbs, FrederickTailor320
Solomon, IsraelBookbinder220
Otto, GeorgeBaker720
Grey, JohnMiner420
Bryant, JohnChiswickTailor220
Thorn, JohnShoemaker220
Nixon, RobertShipwright320
Arthur, JamesSlater320
Black, ThomasCarpenter220
Gudgeon, RobertBlacksmith220
Lamont, ArchibaldCooper520
M’Millan, ArchibaldCarpenter520
M’Allerton, CharlesBrickmaker720
Towers, ThomasStone-mason420
Tynan, JamesSlater520
Sheridan, WalterMason320
M’Farlane, WilliamWeaver220
Scott, HoptonHatter1220
Cronan, ThomasMason320
Howard, MichaelMason320
Kane, HughSlater820
Kane, HughMason520
Donohoe, JohnBaker220
Bradford, JohnBaker720
Steenson, SamuelFarmer520
Williams, DavidCooper820
Morris, JeremiahSawyer620
Hughes, JamesButcher320
Vanee, JamesJoiner220
Roberts, GeorgeCooper220
Sharpe, JohnTin-plate-worker420
Tucker, JamesTyler320
Duff, RobertHatter320
Bragg, PhilipButcher620
Bradshaw, GeorgePipe-maker420
Walker, JamesWeaver420
Herridge, WilliamSmith520

Van Diemen’s Land

NameTradeNumber of Persons
in each Family
Amount granted
to each
Wilson, JamesBaker320
Flock, WilliamBricklayer520
Bibb, JohnEngineer220
Marain, MichaelBlacksmith25
Bradshaw, JosephGardener216
Russell, RobertBlacksmith1120
Bird, DavidShoemaker220
Marshall, WilliamShoemaker220
Botterill, WilliamTailor220
Smith, EdwardWheelwright420
Wilkinson, ThomasShoemaker620
Baker, J.D.Hatter220
Collins, ThomasGlazier320
M’Kenzie, JohnBaker320
Hughes, JamesSawyer220
Smales, Joseph H.Sailmaker620
Wright, MartinHairdresser220
Fuller, WilliamEdwardWheelwright220
Hayes, JohnBricklayer320
Taine, GeorgeBricklayer320
Belfour, RichardDyer620
Bolland, James-----420
Downey, ThomasCarpenter420
Kelly, PatrickShoemaker220
Burgess, Thomas S.Joiner220
Daly, ThomasPlumber720
Bradshaw, ThomasWeaver520
Haynes, JamesMason620
Cleghorne, JohnMason220
Watson, ThomasPrinter420
Carte, WilliamCarpenter620
Puzey, VernonBlacksmith420
Curtis, JamesTanner320
Watson, WilliamCarpenter520
Pott, GeorgeCarpenter220
Bennell, JohnBricklayer320
Martin, ThomasCooper220
Tyrrell, RobertBaker520
Newall, Robert------15
Rundell, DanielBlacksmith420
Woon, JamesShoemaker620
Kirk, JohnMason216
Chapman, StephenMason220
Lyons, WilliamMachinist220
Kay, RobertPlasterer520
Masters, JosephCooper420
Stole, JohnCarpenter220
Stiles, HenryShepherd920
Wiseman, JohnHarness-maker220
Wilson, WilliamPrinter220
Wood, GeorgeSaddler320
Sanderson, JohnBlacksmith220
Goldie, DavidCartwright220
Swan, ThomasJoiner214
Stewart, AlexanderGlazier220
Argo, FrancisFarrier220
Allan, JamesCoach-builder320
Robinson, HenryMillwright420
Vazacherly, MichaelSmith420
Young, John T.Fish-curer420
Thompson, WilliamJoiner220
Clarke, AlexanderMillwright220
Greene, HenryBricklayer220
Regan, JohnCurrier520
Young, RandallBlacksmith220
Hayes, WilliamShoemaker220
Draper, MathewCooper620
Dowling, ThomasBlacksmith220
White, ThomasCarpenter420
Seabrook, HenryWilliamCarpenter320
Rowsell, WilliamCarpenter320
Roberts, RichardCarpenter320
Drake, JohnGlass-cutter220
Randall, CharlesButcher620
White, GeorgeCarpenter420
Evans, WilliamBaker320
Strutt, ThomasStone-cutter320
Strutt, WilliamMason420
Nettlefold, ThomasSmith520
Lankshear, JohnBrewer220
Lewis, GideonBuilder520
Shalless, JohnCarpenter220
Salter, WilliamIron-plate-worker220
Hutch, RobertBaker420
Clarke, AndrewPloughwright320
Dodd, WilliamJoiner520
Campbell, WilliamBaker320
Reid, JamesJoiner620
Clark, DavidCartwright420
Short, WilliamJoiner320
Forsyth, JamesJoiner420
Jessop, GeorgePainter920
Caton, JosephGardener920
Hopkins, GeorgeWheelwright520
Pearson, RobertDyer320
Collins, RobertBricklayer820
Newton, ThomasCandle-maker820
Sadler, JamesTailor820
Crook, JamesShoemaker620
Russell, WilliamCooper320
Everard, PatrickBaker520
Rafferty, EdwardShoemaker220
Roberts, ______Coach-maker220
Fenwick, HenryRope-maker720
Darling, RobertMason220
Byrne, CorneliusTailor420
Burns, JohnTailor620
Flanagan, DanielMason320
Greene, JeremiahCurrier220
M’Donnell, EdwardBlacksmith420
Burnett, RobertJoiner320
Kay, JosephGunsmith520
Ferguson, PeterBrick-maker620
Turley, AbrahamCordwainer620
Kidd, ThomasMason220
Fimm, JohnBaker220
Edwards, JamesCabinet-maker220
Edwards, JohnGunsmith520
Hutton, DavidMillwright320
Mason, JohnComb-maker720
Borkett, WilliamJoiner320
Brown, JosephBrick-maker620
Warrington, JohnBrick-maker320
Francis, AnthonyWeaver520
Hampton, JohnCarpenter220
Watchurst, SamuelGlazier320
Burgess, JamesBaker520
Anderson, JohnCarpenter520
Barker, JonahSawyer220
Hollings, JohnTailor220
Styles, GeorgeClerk420
Walker, WilliamCabinet-maker420
Marsh, HenryWharfinger420
Tyler, ThomasMason220
Purcell, WilliamFurnace-man220
Barnett, WilliamBricklayer620
Sims, EbenezerBricklayer520
Rankin, AlexanderMalster
(sailed on ship William from Liverpool 6th Nov. 1832to Hobart Town 7th Mar. 1833)
820
The Hobart Town Courier, Friday 15 March 1833, p. 3

TRADE AND SHIPPING.

Arrived on Saturday the ship William, 384 tons, Capt. David Boag, from Liverpool 6th November, with a general cargo. Passengers:- Mr. Foote, Mr. F. Foote, Mr. and Mrs. Kelsh, Mr. Bernard, Mr. Munt, Mr. Morgan, Miss Black, Mrs. and Miss Pallard, Mr. Todd, Mr. and Mrs. Higgrett and 2 children, Messrs. Wilkinson, Wright, Sutherland, Campbell, Oakley, Brumby, Mr. and Mrs. O'Brien, Helen Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Jeaffeath and 2 children, Mr. Clark and 31 for Sydney.

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Tuesday 2 April 1833, p. 2

From Liverpool and Hobart Town, yesterday, the ship William (324 tons), Captain Boag. Lading, merchandise. Passengers:- Mr. John Gordon, merchant, from Hobart Town ; Mr. James Odshend, surgeon, from Scotland ; Rev. George Todd and Miss Ann Black, from England, and 23 steerage passengers.

Jeffcott, JohnCarpenter420
O’Brien, ChristopherWatch-maker220
Shields, JohnCarpenter520
Grisley, JohnEngineer820
Dawson, RichardBlacksmith320
Mathews, EdwardMarble-polisher220
Stevenson, ThomasNailor220
Meagar, GeorgeMillwright320
Ailsby, BarkwithMiller320
Gregory, RichardThatcher420
Nixon, GeorgePotter320
Parnell, SamuelCabinet-maker220
Garrett, BenjaminBaker220
Dillon, JohnTailor520
Keage, WilliamMason420
Sutcliff, ZechariahBrick-maker220
Conkey, JamesShoemaker220
Adkins, JamesShipwright420
Dee, PeterCarpenter220
Hackshir, DavidWhitesmith220
Tynan, FrancisPainter420
O’Leary, ThomasCarpenter420
Davis, ThomasTailor220
Hendrick, ThomasShoemaker320
Kelly, RichardSlater320
Tullam, RobertShoemaker520
Smith, JohnSaddler420
M’Manus, JohnBlacksmith320
Tracey, WilliamHatter420
Brady, PhilipPainter620
Boyd, RobertStone-mason220
M’Kay, HectorShoemaker320
Lyell, AlexanderCarpenter520
Hamilton, JohnBlacksmith520
Jackson, GeorgeSawyer620
Bacon, JohnStone-mason220
Bacon, DennisMason520
Berne, ThomasCoach-smith420
Gray, ThomasCarpenter420
Higgins, CharlesBaker320
Rough, JamesCarpenter220
M’Carvil, BernardSawyer420
Redmond, LaurenceCarpenter220
Scully, JamesTailor320
Toole, PatrickBricklayer320
Whalan, JohnStone-cutter520
Coghill, GeorgeShoemaker520
Anderson, HughBricklayer420
Bumford, IsaacCarpenter320
Craven, JamesSlater420
Dallon, MichaelSawyer420
Hayes, RobertWhitesmith220
Joyce, HenryBricklayer320
Kenned, AngusCarpenter520
Kearns, LaurenceCarpenter420
Leggat, PatrickCarpenter220
Milroy, WilliamCarpenter320
Malone, MichaelStone-cutter220
O’Neill, JohnNailor420
Ryan, HenryCarpenter320
Reilly, OwenCarpenter220
Ryder, PatrickSmith220
Travers, HenryBricklayer420
Wallace, ThomasStone-setter620
Bowden, WilliamGlazier220
Barry, JamesBricklayer220
Barman, RobertCarpenter520
Cross, WilliamBlacksmith520
Douglas, NathanielSaddler720
Davis, EdwardCarpenter220
Dunn, JohnMillwright320
Egan, ThomasShoemaker220
Finigan, PeterCooper320
Hughes, JohnStone-cutter220
Halpin, AndrewCarpenter420
Hopson, JohnBlacksmith1020
Hamilton, ThomasPainter320
Kearney, RichardCabinet-maker220
Kearney, WilliamLeather-dresser420
M’Cann, ThomasLeather-dresser420
Murphy, WilliamCarpenter320
Mullocks, RobertCarpenter420
M’Casey, JohnCarpenter220
Rourke, DanielSmith420
Redmond, JosephPainter320
Reynolds, PatrickSmith420
Tooles, TobiasPainter620
Thompson, JamesClock-maker320
Walsh, RichardCarpenter520
Whitelaw, AndrewCarpenter320
Burnett, JamesCarpenter220
Byrne, EdwardTanner420
Darby, JamesTanner420
Dolen, JamesTailor220
Hill, JamesCarpenter220
Jolly, ThomasCarpenter620
Leahy, ThomasCooper320
Robinson, JohnTailor320
Matthew, CharlesCoach-maker520
Pearson, LeonardCabinet-maker220
Browne, T.Wheelwright620
Browne, WilliamBlacksmith620
Collier, JohnBlacksmith420
Aitcheson, J.Weaver420
Boyd, RobertBrewer220
Bruce, JamesBlacksmith520
Cunningham,SkirwinSmith220
Gould, WilliamMason420
Heron, JamesDyer620
Kittely, ThomasWeaver1220
Leyes, CharlesMason320
M’Near, WilliamStone-cutter420
Murdoch, GeorgeCarpenter420
Mackie, G.Sawyer620
Panton, DavidTailor620
Petrie, GeorgeSawyer220
Riddle, WilliamBaker820
Read, W.W.Blacksmith620
Smith, AlexanderMillwright420
Taylor, GeorgeGardener220
Walkinshaw, GideonJoiner220
Watt, WilliamMason920
Young, J.Baker420
Cumming, J.Mason320
Hyde, J.Blacksmith220
Jack, AlexanderWeaver420
M’Vurras, JohnJoiner720
Booth, T.Cabinet-maker320
Duffy, DennisCoach-smith220
M’Dowell, JohnSlater220
Mara, J.Cabinet-maker620
Newall, WilliamSmith620
O’Brien, JosephShoemaker420
Simpson, WilliamBricklayer220
Dawson, James-----620
Latham, George-----220
Hood, Robin V.Carpenter420
Burton, WilliamCarpenter220
Elwin, WilliamCement-maker220
Mitchelmore,ElkanahCarpenter
(sailed 31 March1833 on the barque MaryAnn from Plymouth to Hobart town, 12th Aug. 1833)
720
The Hobart Town Courier, Friday 16 August 1833, p. 3

TRADE AND SHIPPING.

Arrived same day [Monday], the bark Mary Anne, 278 tons, Capt. James Jacks, from Plymouth 31st March, with a general cargo of goods. Passengers:- Mrs. King, Miss Drake, Mr. Anderson, Mr. Parsons, Mr. Pearse, super-cargo, with 24 in the steerage. Also, for Sydney, Lieut. Morton, R.N., Mrs. Morton and 2 daughters, and 2 in the steerage.

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 16 November 1833, p. 2

From London and Launceston, same day [yesterday], the barque Mary Ann (275 tons), Captain Jacks, with wheat and merchandise. Passengers:- Lieutenant T. Morton, R. N., Mrs. Eliza Morton, Miss Ellen Morton, Mr. John Clyne, Mr. Robert Rewcastle ; Thomas Yall, rope maker ; Thomas May, baker ; Edward Barker, baker ; Samuel Thickness ; John Johnston farmer, and son ; Mary Johnston ; Mary Ann Darke ; Elisabeth Fulford ; John, William, Sidney, and Ellen Burt ; Silus Knight ; George Webster, and James Calludes.

Graham, WilliamWeaver320
Hale, GeorgeWeaver820
Maygar, GeorgeSlater420
Russell, WilliamWeaver620
Shearn, WilliamPrinter320
Veitch, WalterBaker620
Whitehead, DanielWeaver520
Owenson, JamesGardener420
Kearney, ThomasSmith320
Comerford, PatrickBlacksmith620
Sings, GeorgeTailor320
Pardoe, MichaelNail-maker420
Stephens, StephenSawyer220
Slater, WilliamShoemaker320
Slater, NicholasShoemaker520
Smith, LewisCoppersmith320
Cations, AlexanderTanner320
Dykes, JamesShoemaker420
Johnston, JohnJoiner320
Robertson, AndrewBlacksmith420
Bradley, PatrickCooper
(sailed 15 June 1833on the barque Lady East from Liverpool to Hobart,22nd Oct. 1833)
220
The Hobart Town Courier, Friday 25 October 1833, p. 3

TRADE AND SHIPPING.

On the same day [23rd inst.], the bark Lady East, 648 tons, Capt. Alexander Strachan, from Liverpool 15th June, with a general cargo, consisting of salt &c. Passengers:- Mr. and Mrs.Harnett [Harnell ?] and 2 children, Mr. & Mrs. Higgins, Mr. and Mrs. Lindsay, Miss Murray, Miss M.and MissC.Murray,Mr.Murray. Mr. Paterson, Mr. McGelchie, Dr. Harnett, Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell and 209 others.

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Saturday 16 November 1833, p. 2

From Liverpool and Hobart Town, the same day [yesterday], the ship Lady East (668 tons), Captain Strachan, with merchandise. Passengers;- Mr. Lawrence Harnell, farmer, Mr. Harnell [Harnett Mrs. ?], and 5 children ; Mr. John McGechie, merchant ; Mr. J. Higgins, merchant ; Mr. Joseph Mitchell, merchant, and Mrs. Ann Mitchell ; Mr. W. Lindsey, and Mrs. Lindsey [Lindsay] ; and P. Harnatt, Esq., surgeon ; and 236 steerage passengers.

Beveridge, WilliamJoiner220
Dickson, JamesCartwright520
Reid, JohnJoiner220
Barry, AlexanderCabinet-maker320
Barry, AlexanderBaker
(sailed 15 June 1833on the barque Lady East from Liverpool to Hobart,22nd Oct. 1833)
320
Baxter, HenryWeaver320
Crabb, JamesCabinet-maker220
Donovan, JeremiahSmith
(sailed 15 June 1833on the barque Lady East from Liverpool to Hobart,22nd Oct. 1833)
320
Hall, WilliamWeaver820
Jackman, ThomasShipwright520
Richardson, AlfredShipwright320
Tapping, CalebWoolcomber220
Thompson,AlexanderCartwright520
White, ThomasBrass-founder320
Somerville, JamesMason620
M’Gregor, JohnTailor220
Gordon, AlexanderStone-mason220
Reynolds, GeorgeBricklayer620
Davenport, JohnCarpenter320
Thompson, WalterJoiner320
Alexander, JamesBlacksmith420
Weir, ColinBlacksmith420
Watson, JonathanCabinet-maker320
Goodman, GeorgePainter320
Goodman, AugustusCarpenter320
Johnson, ThomasChair-maker420
M’Gregor, JamesJoiner420
Dalgleish, WilliamMason520
Williams, DanielJoiner420
Hunter, WilliamBlacksmith220
Wood, JamesCarpenter220
Hall, ChristopherWeaver320
Borthwick, WilliamPrinter
(sailed 15 June 1833on the barque Lady East from Liverpool to Hobart,22nd Oct. 1833)
820
Anderson, PhilipHouse-painter220
Emes, RoderickPlasterer320
Ferguson, DanielNailor420
Doyle, JohnCollier320
Hopson, ThomasHarness-maker220
Tancred, RichardCurrier320
Unsworth, JohnWeaver820
M’Leod, HughJoiner320
M’Cann, JamesPlasterer220
Colbeck, JohnTailor720
Lambell, RichardCarpenter320
Lambell, WilliamCarpenter220
Robins, WilliamPlasterer
(sailed 12 May 1833on the barque Ann from London to Hobart, 29thSept.1833)
220
The Hobart Town Courier, Friday 4 October 1833, p. 3

TRADE AND SHIPPING.

Arrived on Sunday the 29th ult, the bark Ann, 366 tons, Capt. Free, T. H. James, esq. owner, from London 12th May, with a general cargo. Passengers:- Mr. James, Mr Garrard, Mr. Winter, Mr. Dyne, Mr. Welsh, Mr. Vennell. Mr. Bayley, Mr. Sloman, Dr. Dickson, Mr. and Mrs. Russell, Mrs. Stewart, Miss Barker, Mr. Ward, Mr. Benjamin, Mr. Mores, Mr and Mrs. Solomon, do. jun. [Mr. Solomon junior], Mr. Ray and child, Mr. Allen, Mr. and Miss Batten, Mr. and Mrs. Shillito, Mr. and Mrs. Shepherd, Mr. Carter, Mr. Tomlins, Master Russell, and 51 in the steerage.

The Ann touched at Rio, where the vessel stopped 11 days.

The Ann, Capt. Free, was only 37 days running from the Cape of Good Hope to this port.

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Thurdsay 14 November 1833, p. 2

From London and Hobart Town, yesterday, having left the former place the 1st of May, and the latter the 20th of October, the barque Ann, Captain Free. Lading, merchandise. Passengers;- T. Horton James, Esq., Mrs. McClymont and 3 children, Mrs. Stewart, Mr. Alexander Russell, Miss Matilda Barker, Dr. Dickson, Mr. Richard Fennell, Mr. Thomas Sloman, Mr. Charles Bailey, Mr. Frederick Welch, Mr. Charles James Garrard, Mr. Robert Hyland, Mr. Thomas Coutts, from Hobart Town ; Mr. S. Solomon, Sarah Solomon, John Solomon, Sarah Solomon, George Ray, Samuel Bengam, Elias Moses, James Russell, Mrs. Merlin Ladd, Richard Ladd, Charles Underwood, Alfred Smith, — Smith, Henry Robson, Mrs. Sarah Robson and 3 children, William Chester, George Corydon, Alfred Blake, William Cooper, John Cochlaud, Jane Cochland and 2 children, James Kennedy, and James Rush.

Stuart, JohnCabinet-maker320
Baley, JohnShoemaker220
Biggs, AbrahamCarpenter720
Butler, JohnWool-sorter320
James, ThomasCoach-smith420
Manley, ThomasConfectioner720
Anderson, WilliamJoiner620
Bailey, JohnShoemaker420
Pinnington, WalterTailor220
Weavell, EdwinWire-drawer520
Turner, WilliamMillwright220
Goodwin, EdwardCarpenter620
Cullen, EdwardStonemason720
M’Annally, ThomasBricklayer220
White, WilliamSmith520
Flim, PatrickTanner220
Flaherty, JohnCabinet-maker620
Brien, ThomasCarpenter220
Timmins, OwenBricklayer820
Connor, JohnBricklayer320
Kavanah, MichaelBricklayer520
Adams, ArthurCabinet-maker320
M’Kewn, ThomasCarpenter220
Byrne, GeorgeBrewer420
Cuthbert, WilliamTailor220
Taman, JohnSawyer220
Moore, JamesBaker520
Reed, JohnStonemason220
Kearney, ChristopherCoachsmith220
Maher, RichardCarpenter320
Cary, JamesSawyer220
Gould, MathewWheelwright420
Foy, JamesCarpenter220
Byrne, MichaelCabinet-maker220
Cronin, JohnTanner220
Clark, RobertPainter520
Sheehy, JohnShoemaker420
Murphy, RobertMason520
Lise, E. Smithprinter620
Kaim, MathewStonemason720
Murphy, LukeStonemason220
Fry, JohnStonemason420
Donohoe, RichardBricklayer220
M’Crie, JosephShoemaker220
Linnett, PatrickShoemaker220
M’Crie, JohnShoemaker320
Madden, JamesWeaver220
Mooney, JohnCarpenter420
Malcolm, JamesShoemaker220
Hoar, ThomasShoemaker520
Connor, ThomasCarpenter220
Kelly, JamesCarpenter220
O’Brien, EdwardCoach-smith220
Spratt, JamesStonemason1020
Francis, WilliamBricklayer320
Sheridan, MichaelSlater620
Short, JamesSlater320
Finegan, PatrickSlater220
Prestige, SamuelCarpenter520
Delass, WilliamPlasterer220
Coffy, MichaelSmith220
Tracey, ArthurSmith320
Dingle, GeorgeSmith220
Mealen, CharlesCabinet-maker220
Ralph, WilliamCabinet-maker520
Somerfield, FrederickCarpenter220
Bosward, JosephCarpenter220
Rennie, WilliamShoemaker220
Lewis, GeorgeCordwainer320
Anst, ThomasMason720
Webb, ThomasCarpenter620
Blackmore, JamesPlasterer220
Abbott, WilliamBrewer620
Rankin, JohnBricklayer
(sailed on barque Edward Colston from Liverpool 15th Jun. 1833to Hobart Town 10th Oct. 1833)
320
The Hobart Town Courier, Friday 11 October 1833, p. 3& Friday 18 October 1833, p. 3

TRADE AND SHIPPING.

Arrived yesterday the bark Edward Colston 340 tons, Capt. Hammond, from Liverpool 15th June, with a general cargo. Passengers:- Mr. and Mrs. J. Broch and 2 children, Mr. and Mrs. McPherson, with 52 in the steerage, and 20 children — also, for Sydney, Mr. and Mrs. Pearson and 7 children, Mr. Fitzsimmons and brother, with 41 in the steerage and 22 children, in all 157 passengers.

The following are the names of the 30 females who have arrived by the Edward Colston :- Sarah and Lydia Kemp, Jane Forbes, Elisa and Mary Plunkett, Dilhanly, Mary Ann, Eliza and Catharine Roach, Sarah Ward, Eliza McGrieth, Mary Ann and Rose Harford, Eliza Egan, Bridget Niel, Esther Ratlidge, Ellen O'Bryan, Margaret Mason, Mary Farrell, Mary Ann Brannan, Bridget Coffey, Mary Smith, Ann Scott, Ann Doyle, Jane Harrington, Jane Walsh, Mary A. Madden, Mary Broughall, Margaret McGinnes, Jane Gilchrist, Sarah and Charlotte Aust, Marga ret Barry, Eliza Rice ; also the following tradesmen, viz.-3 joiners, 1 mason, 2 plasterers, 1 gardener, 1 farmer, 1 waiter.

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, Thurdsay 21 November 1833, p. 2

From Liverpool and Hobart Town, on Tuesday, the barque Edward Coulstone (340 tons), Captain Hammond. Lading, merchandise. Passengers:- Mr. John Pearson, Mrs. Sarah Pearson, Miss Harriet Pearson, Eliza Pearson, Ann Pearson, Robert Pearson, Edward Pearson, Stephen Pearson, Mary Emma Pearson, Charles Fitzsimons, Mathew Fitzsimons, Miss Isabella Waddle, Mr. Joseph McPherson, Mrs. Catherine McPherson, and 61 steerage passengers.

Macbrath, JamesCooper220
Inglis, JamesUpholsterer420

No. 3

Return of the Number of unmarried Females who have emigrated to New South Wales and Van Diemen’s Land since the formation of the Board of Emigration up to the present time, having accepted Assistance by way of Bounty from Government; specifying, First, the Colony to which such Emigration took place; Secondly, the Amount of Assistance granted.

Name of the ColonyNumber of FemalesAmount of Money Granted to Them
New South Wales761£ 9,812
Van Diemen’s Land509£ 7,114

Emigrants, from Great Britain, Ireland, to Australia, 1825-1832 (15)

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FAQs

Why did the British migrate to Australia in the 1800s? ›

The British colonial government strongly encouraged immigration in the 1800s, believing that Australia's small population had to grow to ensure the economic development and security of the colonies.

What caused many immigrants to go to Australia in the 1850s? ›

From 1831 the British and Australian colonial governments paid, or partly paid, for thousands of migrants to move to Australia. This boosted the population of the Australian colonies and at the same time reduced the need for convict labour. From 1832 until the 1850s around 357,000 assisted migrants came to Australia.

Where did immigrants arrive in Australia? ›

Altogether 80,000 arrived in New South Wales between 1788 and 1840. From the 1830s they were joined by small numbers of voluntary migrants, again principally from Britain and Ireland. Some came under their own resources, others with assistance from one of the public or private schemes then available.

How long did it take to get from England to Australia in the 1850s? ›

On its maiden voyage from London to Adelaide via the Cape of Good Hope, the Orient set a new record, making the journey in just 38 days.

Why did Irish migrate to Australia? ›

Immigration History from Ireland to Victoria

The Irish famine of the 1840s caused large numbers of people to migrate due to poverty and difficult living conditions. They worked in Victoria as whalers, fishermen and farm hands and in townships as labourers and factory workers.

Where did most immigrants come from in the 1800s? ›

Between 1870 and 1900, the largest number of immigrants continued to come from northern and western Europe including Great Britain, Ireland, and Scandinavia. But "new" immigrants from southern and eastern Europe were becoming one of the most important forces in American life.

Where are the immigrants from in 1883? ›

They are European, hailing from Germany, and Josef is established as one of the few amongst them that can speak English. This ultimately elevates his status amongst the group, as he is able to relay information between both parties.

When did the British migrate to Australia? ›

From 1788 to 1868 Britain transported more than 160,000 convicts from its overcrowded prisons to the Australian colonies, forming the basis of the first migration from Europe to Australia.

What are 3 major events that brought immigrants to Australia where did these immigrants come from? ›

Australia's Immigration History

Driven by the promise of a new life the Great Southern Land, waves of immigrants came to find fortune in the gold rush, to escape the social upheaval of the Industrial Revolution, two world wars and the aftermath of the Vietnam War.

How can I find out when someone came to Australia? ›

If you arrived in Australia before 1 January 1973, you might find your arrival record by searching the passenger arrivals index in our RecordSearch database. The passenger arrivals index has more than 10 million records, including: arrival by air at all airports from 1965 to 1972.

How do I find my immigrant passenger list? ›

Use Form NATF 81or order online to obtain copies of inbound Federal passenger arrival manifests for ships and airplanes, 1820-1959. Passenger arrival and departure records dated post 1957 were filmed by the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) and the original paper records were not retained.

How do I look up immigration records? ›

Freedom of Information and Privacy Act (FOIA)

Use our online FOIA system to request your own immigration record, another person's immigration record, or non-A-File information such as policies, data, or communications.

When did the most immigrants come to Australia? ›

The Australian continent was first settled when ancestors of Indigenous Australians arrived via the islands of Maritime Southeast Asia and New Guinea over 50,000 years ago.
...
Gold rush and population growth.
PeriodAnnual average assisted immigrants
1831–186018,268
1861–190010,087
1901–194010,662
1941–198052,960

How many free settlers moved to Australia from Britain? ›

Between 1788 and 1868, approximately 164,000 convicts were transported to the Australian colonies on board 806 ships.

How did people get to Australia? ›

Co-lead researcher Shimona Kealy said these people probably travelled through Indonesia's northern islands, into New Guinea and then Australia, which were part of a single continent between 50,000 and 70,000 years ago, when sea levels were 25-50 metres below the current level.

Why did the British migrate to Australia in 1945? ›

The Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union meant that nuclear war was a real threat and some people saw Australia as a safe place to live. Between 1945 and 1965 more than two million migrants came to Australia. Most were assisted: the Commonwealth Government paid most of their fare to get to Australia.

When did British migrate to Australia? ›

From 1788 to 1868 Britain transported more than 160,000 convicts from its overcrowded prisons to the Australian colonies, forming the basis of the first migration from Europe to Australia.

What happened in the 1880s in Australia? ›

During the 1870s and 1880s the economy was booming, but a severe drought lasting four years from 1890 crippled the economy, resulting in widespread unemployment, poverty and industrial strikes.

What happened in Australia in the 1800s? ›

Gold Rush. The Gold rush led to a huge increase in population. Over 20 years Australia's population tripled to 1.7 million people. The first gold was discovered near Bathurst, NSW.

How many British have migrated to Australia? ›

160,000 convicts came to Australia between 1788 and 1850. Between 1788 and 1840, 80,000 English convicts were transported to New South Wales, with the greatest numbers coming between 1825 and 1835.

Who migrated to Australia? ›

Between 1788 and the mid-20th century, the vast majority of settlers and immigrants came from the British Isles (principally England, Ireland and Scotland), although there was significant immigration from China and Germany during the 19th century.

The number of families who have has assisted emigrated to New South Wales and. Van Diemen’s Land since the formation of the Board of Emigration up to the. present time, having received Loans from Government to enable them to emigrate;. specifying, first, the colony to which such emigration took place; second, the. number of persons in each Family; third, the sssistance granted in Pounds. sterling.. Total Number of Persons in these Families. The Hobart Town Courier , Friday 25 October 1833. From Liverpool and Hobart Town, the same day the ship Lady East ,. with merchandise.. Passengers;- Mr. Lawrence Harnell, farmer, Mr. Harnell Harnett Mrs and. 5 children ; Mr. John McGechie, merchant ; Mr. J. Higgins, merchant ; Mr. Joseph. Mitchell, merchant, and Mrs. Ann Mitchell ; Mr. W. Lindsey, and Mrs. Lindsey and. P. Harnatt, Esq., surgeon ; and 236 steerage passengers.. The Hobart Town Courier , Friday 15 March 1833, p. 3. Passengers:- Mr. Foote, Mr. F. Foote, Mr. and Mrs. Kelsh, Mr. Bernard, Mr.. Munt, Mr. Morgan, Miss Black, Mrs. and Miss Pallard, Mr. Todd, Mr. and Mrs.. Higgrett and 2 children, Messrs. Wilkinson, Wright, Sutherland, Campbell,. Oakley, Brumby, Mr. and Mrs. O'Brien, Helen Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Jeaffeath and 2. children, Mr. Clark and 31 for Sydney.. From Liverpool and Hobart Town, yesterday, the ship William Captain Boag.. Passengers:- Mr. John Gordon, merchant, from Hobart Town ; Mr. James Odshend,. surgeon, from Scotland ; Rev.. George Todd and Miss Ann Black, from England, and. 23 steerage passengers.. Passengers:- Lieutenant T. Morton, R. N., Mrs. Eliza Morton, Miss Ellen. Morton, Mr. John Clyne, Mr. Robert Rewcastle ; Thomas Yall, rope maker ; Thomas. May, baker ; Edward Barker, baker ; Samuel Thickness ; John Johnston farmer, and. son ; Mary Johnston ; Mary Ann Darke ; Elisabeth Fulford ; John, William,. Sidney, and Ellen Burt ; Silus Knight ; George Webster, and James Calludes.. The Hobart Town Courier , Friday 25 October 1833, p. 3. Passengers:- Mr. and Mrs. Harnett and 2 children, Mr. & Mrs. Higgins, Mr. and. Mrs. Lindsay, Miss Murray, Miss M. and Miss C. Murray, Mr. Murray .. The Hobart Town Courier , Friday 4 October 1833

At the same time, landlords were increasing rent and clearing their land of tenants, moving them to coastal areas and filling the land with sheep to meet demand for wool in the Lowlands of Scotland and England.. In contrast to the issues in Scotland, Australia sought labour to fill the numerous employment opportunities developing in the colonies.. With the financial assistance of the HIES, Australia was now a realistic destination for many poor labourers.. Between 1852 and 1857 the Society assisted about 5,000 men, women and children to emigrate to Australia.. Dr Carr recorded that it ‘possessed no appliances for bathing the Emigrants or of cleaning their clothes.’ The filthy accommodation and bedding helped spread disease amongst the travellers, and cause illness and death on board the ships.. The Buchanan family recorded in the passenger list for the 'Georgiana' National Records of Scotland, Highland and Island Emigration Records, HD4/5 page 10. Malcolm McKinnon and his family recorded in the passenger list for the 'Ticonderoga' National Records of Scotland, Highland and Island Emigration Records, HD4/5 page 32. National Records of Scotland, Highland Emigration Society Records, HD4/1.

John Tracy (s. of David & Mary Tracy, living. there) RC, farm labr, 22 years of Bruff,. Limerick, Ireland. Thomas Tracey, RC, farm labourer, 39 years, Cappawhite, husband, (parents: Timothy (farmer) & Mary,. b. Jan 11th, 1802, Baptism certified). Anne Tracey (d. of Patrick & Mary Tracey). RC, housemaid, 19 years of Dublin.. Anne Tracy, 23,. Domestic Servant, Clare Ireland, RC, Both. Margaret Tracy, 19,. Domestic Servant, Clare Ireland, RC, Read. 1828 in Wexford) 19 July 1856 in St Mary's. Cathedral, Sydney, NSW, Australia reg no 369 d: 24. January 1897 in Sydney Hospital, Sydney, NSW Burial: 25 January 1897 R C. Cemetery, Rookwood, NSW. John Tracey b.. Mary Tracey b.. John Tracey (b.c.. Tipperary. born people married in Victoria, Australia pre 1889 Catherine Treacy 1866 / 2656. Daniel Tracy 1874 / 447EdmendTreacy 1878 / 3296. Ellen Tracey 1866 / 3958. Ellen Tracy 1872 / 1718. Eliza Treacy 1869 / 546. Eliza Treacy m. Denis Cumings. 1870/Reg No.4058. James Treacy 1875 / 1845. Margaret Treacy 1874 / 4505. Margaret Tracy 1868 / 452. Margaret Tracy m. Patrick Fogarty 1868 /Reg No.1593. Mary Treacy 1868 / 1772. Thomas Tracey 1871 / 1733. William Tracey 1868 / 1685. William Treacy 1875 / 4293.

This is the government immigrant’s mess room[image shown]: on the left-hand side on the wall Scottish immigrants and on the other side the Irish immigrants.. Again the organisation, as I said, transportation to New South Wales ceased in 1840 but there were convicts in the Hyde Park Barracks in Sydney – now a museum that is well worth a visit to when you are in Sydney - until the first shipload of Famine orphan girls arrived in Sydney in 1848 when they suddenly thought ‘Hang on we have 250 single women here, what are we going to do with them?’ They stayed on board the boat for a little while, while they organised for them to go to the Barracks.. Children of bounty immigrants - there was a bounty immigration scheme where settlers could pay a certain amount of money to get out perhaps agricultural labourers, dairy maids or some form of worker that they particularly wanted for their business so they paid a bounty or a proportion of money for those people to come.. For all immigration, and I am talking New South Wales because we are talking early nineteenth century and it’s basically New South Wales, there are: immigration agents lists; immigration boards lists; and entitlement certificates - all of these give you details about your Irish immigrants.. Other records include: correspondence between the New South Wales immigration department from 1847 onwards; records of Colonial and Immigration Commissioners from 1840 onwards; and various immigration records related records of the Colonial Office.

The Layton departed England on Friday, 16 August 1833 and would take just over four months to make the journey to Sydney.. To such the change from their condition in England to the comfortable situations they are at once sure to obtain, cannot but prove highly advantageous : and those who persevere a right course, not only in time obtain liberal wages, but may look forward in a country, where the disparity between the sexes is so great, to marry under circumstances of respectability and comfort, far beyond what they can hope for in the crowded population of Britain.. The Laytons, Female Emigrants.. The extraordinary scenes of disgusting profligacy which are said to have been exhibited by a great number of the females of “good character and industrious habits,” sent out by the London Emigration Committee, afford another instance of the prodigal and scandalous prostitution of the purposes for which the funds of the colony were voted by the council.. When the Layton left London that Friday in August, the Bloomfield family was on board.. William Crookshanks was a convicted house robber who had received a sentence of transportation for 14 years at Winchester on 28 February 1825.

The first ship to transport passengers from England to the United States in 1620.. From then on, there was a big push to get skilled labourers from England to emigrate to the new colony, and as an enticement they were offered free passage (assisted passage).. Of course there was still the option for anyone who wished to emigrate to pay their own way (known as unassisted passage), but many took up the offer of the emigration scheme, and as a result these pioneers helped make South Australia what it is today.. The children of parents sent out by the Commissioners will receive a free passage, if they are under one, or fall 15 years of age at the time of embarkation.. On the arrival of the Emigrants in the colony, they will be received by an Officer, who will supply their immediate wants, assist them in reaching the place of their destination, be ready to advise with them in case of difficulty, and at all times give them employment at reduced wages on the Government works, if from any cause they should be unable to obtain it elsewhere.

The National Archives has passenger arrival records, sometimes called "ship passenger lists," for arrivals to the United States from foreign ports between approximately 1820 and December 1982 (with gaps).. Passenger arrival and departure records dated post 1957 were filmed by the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) and the original paper records were not retained.. The accessioned microfilm reels now in the custody of the National Archives in Washington, DC, are the record copies of the original paper records which no longer exist.. The National Archives is in the process of transferring the microfilm to a digital format, and all digitized copies will eventually be available online via the National Archives Catalog .. Please note: All requests for passenger arrival records dated post 1957 must include the full name of the passenger; exact day/month/year of arrival; port or airport of arrival; vessel or airline name; and for airport arrivals, the flight number.. Records older than 75 years are publicly available, and many have been digitized by National Archives partners.. See our list of all the digitized records available on our partners' websites .. Ancestry and Fold3 are both subscription services that allow free searches of some or all index terms for each title.. Free access to Ancestry.com and Fold3.com is available in all research rooms at the National Archives, including those in our field locations and Presidential Libraries.. Microfilm publications digitized by our partners as part of our digitization partnership agreements will eventually be free online in the National Archives Catalog .. Documentation for arrivals December 1982 and after are held by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).. The USCIS arrival records and A-Files are available through the USCIS Freedom of Information Act Program (FOIA) .

Home › Irish Emigration › Immigration from Ireland to England. Irish immigration to England dates back further than most. people realise.. Some towns – especially London,. Bristol, Whitehaven – had a sizeable population of middle class Irish traders as early. as the 1650s, and, of course, seasonal work, typically agricultural labouring, needed migrants to help with the annual harvests.. Irish immigration to England followed remarkably similar settlement patterns. from 1851 to 1921, despite the overall decline in numbers of people leaving. Ireland for Britain during that period.. Irish immigration to England followed remarkably similar settlement patterns. from 1851 to 1921, despite the overall decline in numbers of people leaving. Ireland for Britain during that period.. Manchester. was one of the big three destination cities for Irish immigration to England.. A year after the potato blight first struck in Ireland, Irish immigration to. England really took off.. Liverpool could not cope with the vast influx of Irish immigrants; in June. 1847, under the new Poor Law Removal Act, about 15,000 Irish were deported back. to Ireland.. While early industrial migrations brought many to the city, not all Irish. immigration to England was centred on big urban centres.. While early industrial migrations brought many to the city, not all Irish. immigration to England was centred on big urban centres.. Outside London and the garrison towns of Colchester, Chatham and (from 1854). Aldershot, the south east of England attracted relatively few Irish.. There's no need to search for naturalisation resources if you're seeking. details of Irish immigration to England.. Since. Irish Independence, special arrangements have been in force; all Irish citizens. having an automatic status of 'settled' in the UK.. There's no need to search for naturalisation resources if you're seeking. details of Irish immigration to England.. Since. Irish Independence, special arrangements have been in force; all Irish citizens. having an automatic status of 'settled' in the UK.

Irish emigration between 1850 and 1960 is best divided into three periods: 1850 to 1854, when most migrants still responded to the Great Famine's immediate effects; 1855 to 1929, when (as in 1850 to 1854) the great majority of Irish migrants went to the United States ; and 1930 to 1960, when Irish emigration flowed primarily to Great Britain .. Between 1855 and 1929, the classic period of postfamine emigration, nearly five million Irish men and women emigrated to overseas destinations.. In addition, it appears that relatively affluent, skilled and/or educated Protestants (and Catholics) from Ulster and Leinster were disproportionately represented among migrants to Canada, Australia, New Zealand , and South Africa , whereas poorer Ulster men and women probably comprised a majority of migrants to Britain.. Demography, State, and Society: Irish Migration to Britain, 1921–1971.. "Emigration, 1801–1870.". "Emigration, 1871–1921.". "The Irish in Britain, 1871–1921."

Also, the 1680s and 1690s witnessed the start of Irish Protestant migration to North America , as Ulster Presbyterians migrated to the Chesapeake, while Irish Quakers and Baptists sailed to Pennsylvania and New Jersey .. Perhaps 60 percent of the total were Ulster Presbyterians (or Scots-Irish); a fifth to a fourth were Catholics from both Ulster and southern Ireland, and (despite continued Quaker migration) most of the remainder were Anglicans, members of the legally established Church of Ireland .. R. J. Dickson identified four major phases of Ulster Presbyterian migration to prerevolutionary America: 1717 to 1720, when several clergymen led entire congregations to New England ; 1725 to 1729, when some 8,000 Scots-Irish disembarked at or near Philadelphia and, in lesser numbers, at Charleston; 1730 to 1769, when perhaps 70,000 Presbyterians left Ulster, primarily. for the Delaware River; and 1770 to 1775, when Ulster emigration, mostly to Philadelphia and to the Deep South, peaked at 40,000 or more.. Also, in 1791 British vessels began shipping Irish convicts to New South Wales , and even Irish migration to the United States was not entirely voluntary, as it included about 2,500 Protestants and Catholics who fled the suppression of the United Irish rebellion in 1798.. Miller, Kerby A. Emigrants and Exiles: Ireland and the Irish Exodus to North America.

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Author: Reed Wilderman

Last Updated: 08/02/2022

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Name: Reed Wilderman

Birthday: 1992-06-14

Address: 998 Estell Village, Lake Oscarberg, SD 48713-6877

Phone: +21813267449721

Job: Technology Engineer

Hobby: Swimming, Do it yourself, Beekeeping, Lapidary, Cosplaying, Hiking, Graffiti

Introduction: My name is Reed Wilderman, I am a faithful, bright, lucky, adventurous, lively, rich, vast person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.